Text File Importing

 

e-Sword keeps all of the bibles/commentaries/etc. in a rich text format (which is what allows bold, underlining, tool tips, etc. to work) inside the .bbl/.cmt files.  BeST takes regular text files (among other types) and puts it in the .bbl / .cmt files in the rich text format that e-Sword expects.

The process of taking the files and making them understood by e-Sword is 'parsing'. 

To make the process faster, BeST has different levels of "smarts" built in.  If your file is just regular text and doesn't have any formatting codes in it, you can use the 'Raw' setting in the 'Format Conversion' drop-down list (just before you click 'Begin').  If you want to have some things underlined or bold or such, you could put the codes that e-Sword recognizes in the text file (which means BeST doesn't have to think), or you could put some HTML codes in your file and tell BeST to think a little bit harder by changing the 'Format Conversion' to 'Simple' or 'Best'. Then when BeST puts your text into an e-Sword module, it converts the HTML instructions for underlining (<u>underlined text</u>) or bold (<b>bold text</b>) into the instructions used by e-Sword ({\ul underlined text} and {\b bold text} ).

<p> is an HTML instruction for a new paragraph.

 

Flat files can be imported into e-Sword modules by BeST, provided they follow the general formats listed below:

 

B C:V Text

The Book name, abbreviation, or number followed by whitespace (such as a space or tab), followed by a chapter number* , followed by a Colon**, followed by a verse number*, followed by whitespace, followed by the text to be imported.  This option continues to read the text until another B C:V is found anywhere in the line.  As such, this is generally only useful for Bibles (as commentaries tend to have bible references within the text)

Sample

Genesis 1:1 I am just making up the beginning verse of this chapter Genesis 1:2 My memory of these verses would not suffice for me to fill in anything meaningful. Genesis 1:3 And I would probably be breaking copyright if I copied text from somewhere else.

B C:V Text¶

This format is the most popular, and is the default for BeST.  The Book name,abbreviation, or number must begin the line and be followed by whitespace (such as a space or tab), followed by a chapter number* , followed by a colon**, folowed by a verse number* , followed by whitespace, followed by the text to import.  If a line does not start with a book name, then it is appended to the previous line.

Sample

Genesis 1:1 I am just making up the beginning verse of this chapter
Genesis 1:2 My memory of these verses would not suffice for me to fill in anything meaningful.
Genesis 1:3 And I would probably be breaking copyright if I copied text from somewhere else.
Genesis 2:1 When in doubt, it is usually better to go to a source material
Genesis 2:2 Rather than making it up, as I am doing now.
Exodus 1:1 But when you have a sense of humour (or 'humor' as I learned it in the US)
Exodus 1:2 You can see that it is more fun this way.

 

B C¶V Text¶

This format is useful for exporting text that has the Book and Chapter number* as header information followed by each verse for the book and chapter.  Each line must start with either a book and chapter number* or a verse number* followed by the text to be imported.

Sample

Genesis 1
1 I am just making up the beginning verse of this chapter
2 My memory of these verses would not suffice for me to fill in anything meaningful.
3 And I would probably be breaking copyright if I copied text from somewhere else.
Genesis 2
1 When in doubt, it is usually better to go to a source material
2 Rather than making it up, as I am doing now.
Exodus 1
1 But when you have a sense of humour (or 'humor' as I learned it in the US)
2 You can see that it is more fun this way.

 

B.C.V Text

Each line must begin with the Book number followed by a period, followed by a chapter number, followed by a period, followed by a verse number, followed by whitespace, followed by the text to be imported. 

Sample

1.1.1 I am just making up the beginning verse of this chapter
1.1.2 My memory of these verses would not suffice for me to fill in anything meaningful.
1.1.3 And I would probably be breaking copyright if I copied text from somewhere else.
1.2.1 When in doubt, it is usually better to go to a source material
1.2.2 Rather than making it up, as I am doing now.
2.1.1 But when you have a sense of humour (or 'humor' as I learned it in the US)
2.1.2 You can see that it is more fun this way.

 


Footnotes:

*(may be a Roman Numeral if that option is enabled in the import)
** (or other designated separator)